Political Groups

Political groups include groups whose sole purpose is to raise and spend money on political campaigns. This includes political action committees, super PACs, candidate committees and a number of other type of committees designated by the Federal Election Commission. Political groups also include political non-profits with an IRS designation of 501c(4). Political non-profits generally run television advertisements known as issue ads, which don't expressly advocate for the win or defeat of a specific candidate, but are intended to influence politics and political races.

Campaign Finance

$889,917,515 GIVEN
Information

The charts below display political groups' contributions to federal and state races. For federal races, only political contributions over $200 are included in these totals. This is because the Federal Election Commission only requires campaigns to itemize contributions that are more than $200. For state races, the threshhold for itemizing each contribution varies by state.

For more information, see our Campaign Finance Methodology page.

federal data covers from 1989 roughly through Q2 2014
state-level data is not available in bulk for 2014. for current state data, browse http://followthemoney.org/

Contributions to Parties from Political Groups

These charts show how spending from political groups is broken down by party. The bar chart shows the top ten political groups to give money and what party they gave money to. The interactive pie chart can be used to toggle between recipient party and see what groups gavel the most to each party.

Contributions in State and Federal Races from Political Groups

These charts shows the levels of government that benefit from spending by political groups. The Bar chart shows the top contributing groups on the federal and state levels. The interactive pie chart can be used to toggle between top spenders on each level of government.

Contributions from Political Groups and Their Associated Individuals

These charts shows what contributions from a political group actually come from a political group's PAC or an individual associated with a particular political group. The bar chart shows the top ten giving groups whose contributions are made up of PAC contributions or contributions from associated individuals.